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New Product Design & Scalability

New Product Design & Scalability

Project New Product Design & Scalability
Design a new product for a user that manages more than 100 times the number of accounts than the typical user. The new product will be a module that is added to the legacy application.
New Product
The user needs the ability to manage hundreds of thousands of accounts with multiple sub-accounts that contain hundreds of positions. Like managing other financial accounts, the manager wants to know how these accounts are faring and whether he needs to take action. Looking at tens of millions of positions each day could require an enormous staff, we have one or two managers.
Analysis Understanding the workflows of the managers, and whether they were at an automated or manual processing shop, gave us a clear understanding of how the overall navigation and layout of the application should work. Key to the user’s work was noting when exceptions had occurred across the accounts and the positions held. Exceptions included compliance issues, drift from the models, cash issues, requests from the field, automated processing results, and model changes.
Solution The solution incorporated the key workflows directly in the layout of the workspaces. The exceptions were handled in a navigational dashboard that jumped the user to the appropriate workspace carrying the context needed to fix the exception. Providing views into the exceptions allowed the manager to efficiently move through and keep track of the work that needed to be done.
Deliverable The project was delivered as a storyboard that covered 14 workflows. Each workflow was created with screenshots […]

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Knowledge Elicitation

Knowledge Elicitation

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Project Knowledge Elicitation for an Intelligent Tutoring System
Design an intelligent tutoring system to teach infantry basic skills of entering and clearing buildings. The tutoring will occur in a virtual reality system.

KnowledgeElicitation

Understand basic procedural aspects of the tasks at hand as well as the intricacies of visual, auditory and manual movements through the rooms. Memorizing the procedures is one thing, learning the details of working in a team, minimizing causalities and doing things like they are second nature requires deep understanding of what the expert knows.

Research Several tools and techniques were used to create an understanding of the problem space. Procedural learning was performed through manuals. If the rules and procedures are not written down for the purposes of training they are put together in after-action-review briefs. All of this information was gathered and used to create outlines and flowcharts of what individuals were to learn. Multiple interviews were performed with commanders, trainers and field experts. This still remained too cursory to teach an individual how to clear a building. Deeper understanding of the thought process of the experts were pursued with forms of verbal walk-throughs, comparative analysis and creating plans for made up situations. Manual and auditory skills still were needed for the training. Observation of training and practice missions provided hours of video footage. Hands on practice was used to understand the physical parts of the procedures. Many of the assumptions of basic training and advanced weaponry were covered to set guidelines of the prerequisites for MOUT training. Much of the manual, visual and auditory training became important when working in teams. Learning how to communicate […]